N.K. Jemisin

Out now!

The Killing Moon

The Kingdom of Gods

In the desert city-state of Gujaareh, peace is the only law. Along its ancient stone streets, there is no crime or violence. Priests of the dream-goddess, known as Gatherers, maintain order: harvesting the dreams of the citizens, healing the injured, and guiding the dreamers into the afterlife. . .

When Ehiru-the most famous of the city's Gatherers-is sent to harvest the dreams of a diplomatic envoy, he finds himself drawn into a conspiracy that threatens to drag the dreaming city into war.

Learn more.

Observations… theory?

Got the copyedit of The Hundred Thousand Kingdoms today! I’ve never done this before, so I kind of boggled when I started flipping pages and saw all these little squiggly things on it. The folks in my writing group helped me decipher the first few pages, and the stylesheet included with it helps too. It looks like it’s going to be fun to work on this — and I needed to re-read it anyway, now that I’m working on Book 3, for congruity’s sake — but there’s definitely going to be a learning curve involved. Wish me luck.

And in cross-promotional news… over at the Magic District, fellow author Greg van Eekhout has some interesting observations about the state of the science fiction field. He’s got me thinking, and though I’m not ready to put forward a full-fledged theory yet, I do have a few hypotheses:

  1. “Science fiction” is increasingly perceived as just fiction, and just one particular subset of fiction — spaceships and rayguns, basically. This is despite the efforts of people within the field to treat it as a wide literary umbrella (e.g., the Science Fiction Writers of America, whose organizational name includes “and fantasy” even though the acronym hasn’t changed to reflect it, and which also incorporates some horror, YA, etc.).
  2. Science fiction (meaning here all the stuff supposed to fall under the wide umbrella) as a genre is failing to draw in constituents beyond its original target audience — the now-aging white males seen in Greg’s Observation 1. This lost audience includes young people, people of color, international readers (e.g., China), women, and fans of related media like games and anime. There are several factors involved with this failure — issues within the genre itself, an overall decline in book sales, other media’s perception of themselves as unrelated (e.g., video games = entertainment industry, even when the content is science fictional), etc.
  3. For 1 and 2, if the terminology is the problem, then SciFi/SyFi’s decision makes sense.

It’s 1 that interests me most right now, because that’s the new idea for me. I use the term “science fiction” to represent lots of things — science fiction, fantasy, sometimes horror; films, video games, books; the hardcore fandom and the casual watchers who’ve only seen the occasional “Star Trek” episode. But I do tend to use the term “sci fi” only among knowledgeable fellow genre fans, mostly because non-fans don’t seem to use it for fantasy, etc.

For example, when non-genre people ask me about 100K, I say, “It’s a fantasy novel,” or “I’m a fantasy writer.” And I usually further clarify: “You know, like Lord of the Rings or Narnia?” But all my life, I’ve thought of myself as a science fiction writer, and with genre fans I say that. There’s no need for clarification. I write anything that falls under SF’s broad umbrella: spaceships and rayguns, magic, monsters, black holes, dragons, things that go bump in the night. “Sci fi” is the easiest way to say that, among people who read and write the same thing.

But how did it happen that people outside the genre don’t think of it that way — if it’s true that they don’t? This is an hypothesis, after all… but I can’t think of a way to test it. Ideas, anyone?

New Post at the Magic District: Retreats

OK, I know I’ve been posting more at the Magic District lately than I have been here. Sorry, ya’ll. =( Still learning how to juggle all this stuff. And apparently I’m going to be adding more soon; Altered Fluid is thinking about starting a blog. Yo ho, yo ho, a blogger’s life for me…

Anyhow, this week’s post is an expansion of my post here (last week) about the retreat my writing group undertook. So check it out!

Free Drugs and Rock n’ Roll at the Magic District!

…well, no, I just talk about it for free. But it’s the thought that counts!

Tired, but happy

I love my writing group! Last week we went on a retreat, taking over a farm in western Pennsylvania (near Gettysburg), where we spent 5 days doing nothing but writing and hanging out. I have to tell you, I’m not the sort of person who hangs out with a bunch of people easily for 5 hours, let alone 5 days, but this was worth gold.

Altered Fluid at its retreat; taken by Robert
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Sale to Postscripts!

Woo! I sold a short story. It’s called “Sinners, Saints, Dragons, and Haints, in the City Beneath the Still Waters”, and is set in New Orleans during Hurricane Katrina. Sold to the UK print ‘zine, Postscripts. No info yet on publication date, but I’ll keep you posted.

I don’t write short stories often. The problem is that I rarely get discrete ideas. For example, I once started a story about an assassin in a vaguely Egyptian setting who viewed killing as a transcendant religious experience. But that got me thinking about why a religion might consider murder a good thing… which got me thinking about why anyone would need to be murdered… which got me wondering what sort of society would need to develop in order to support this ideology… which got me thinking about how this religion’s cosmology would’ve developed… which got me researching whether the moon of a gas giant could be habitable… which made me wonder whether people living on such a moon might still be able to make the same observations of the heavens that, say, the Egyptians did… which made me wondering whether other people on the same planet would interpret those observations the same way… which made me think about this religious country’s enemies and allies…

The result was two complete novels — unpublished as yet — the outline of a third, and a novella set in the same universe but with different characters… but no short story. The original short story was never finished.

I don’t mind when this happens; I like immersing myself in a novel world more than I like the brief dalliances of a short story. Still, I do wish I’d get short story inspirations more often, because I find them more challenging and exciting to write. I can’t stop myself from writing novels; that’s a compulsion. I do that to stay sane. But forcing myself to work on a more condensed idea, and conveying that idea clearly, takes all my skill. I feel like more of a writer when I do it.

Anyway, in a few months, you’ll be able to read this one. =) Yay!

New post over at the Magic District!

As I mentioned, I’ll be posting stuff on Thursdays over at the Magic District. Today’s post is about sex. Go see!

Now it can be told: The Magic District

Hey, all. Been working for the past few days on a Sekrit Projekt! Which no longer needs to be secret. See, me and some other authors have decided to form an online promotion gang. Well, I heard about it and got jumped in (pummelled by WordPress issues), and now we’re the baddest motheshutyomouths on the internet. …Well, not really. But we will be, one day. =)

Check it out: The Magic District! It goes live on Friday, and we’re promising a new post every day, plus a Sunday “open question” that all of us will answer. Who’s “us”, you say? Well, Margaret Ronald, whom I’ve been raving about here; Greg van Eekhout; Tim Pratt; Diana Rowland; and fellow Orbiteer Rachel Aaron. (Conversations between me and Rachel: “You write 1000 words a day??” “ME TOO!!” “What, yours is also a three-book deal for which you’re now busting your ass to finish books 2 and 3 on time?” “ME TOO!!!” Instant BFF material, I tell you.) It’s a great crew and I’m proud to be aboard. I’m all aflutter!

I’ll be posting on Thursdays, BTW; I start a week from today. We’re going to talk about topics like the secrets of great villainy, and how far one can or should go with fantasy-novel sex (that’s one I’m planning to do for my first post), and so on.

Semi-con report: NYCC 2009

Finally recovering from NYCC and Son of Niece of the Cousin’s Sister’s Dog of the Plague, part 27. The worst of it hit on Friday, where I nevertheless gamely stumbled through the con hall while drugged and semicoherent. Hopefully I didn’t infect several thousand people with my cooties. Saturday I felt better in the morning, but ran down over the course of the day, though I still had fun Sat night when I had impromptu Thai with friends. Sunday I paid for it, when I woke up feeling like crap — at 11, despite going to bed at a reasonable hour the night before. The one panel I’d wanted to attend on Sunday was at 11:15, so that decided me; I stayed home.

All that said, I had a good time. I’m not much into traditional superhero comics, so a goodly portion of NYCC doesn’t really appeal to me, but I’m a raving fan of manga/anime, more indie comics, and of course science fiction and fantasy literature — the latter of which was out in force at the con. All the major SF/F publishers were there, many showing off new pubs and authors, most giving away books. (Bookssses, my precious. We lovesss them.) I came away with a major haul, including many authors I’ve never read before. Picked up the next two volumes (4 & 5) of Neil Gaiman’s Sandman, which I’m only just now reading and have fallen in love with. Also got a chance to play the video game Spore, which I’ve heard about for awhile now but never tried. I’m hooked; that will be my next gift to myself. Said hi to the folks at the Orbit booth, and also touched base with friends at Tor and Lerner Publishing. Also got to see an old buddy, Margaret Ronald, whose book just came out as I mentioned a ways back (pay attention! this will be on the quiz!), and who seems to be taking well to new-author bliss. Fun all around!

Enjoyed the heck out of one of the panels at the con, which talked about images of Asian Americans in superhero comics; they were advertising a forthcoming anthology, Secret Identities, which I’m eager to take a look at now. I think this touches on one of the reasons why I’ve never liked superhero comics; they often use allegories to touch on serious issues (like the way mutants in the Marvel Universe have been used to explore racism and anti-Semitism), yet in the process they too often perpetuate in reality the same problems they’re supposedly trying to address in allegory (like the dearth of actual characters of color and Jewish characters, the relegation of those characters to non-heroic or minor roles, and the virtual absence of diversity among the creators and producers). But some of the stories in this one look really interesting, so I’m looking forward to it.

Didn’t get to the Sci-Fi/Fantasy Authors’ Roundtable, though it sounds like it would’ve been a disappointment. A shame; had some good names on it.

Oh! And I rambled through the artist’s alley at one point, mostly out of boredom, and had a literal stop-in-my-tracks moment when I saw this: “Mesa Enchantress,” by Randy Gallegos. It was done for a Magic the Gathering card — and if I’d realized MtG cards could be so beautiful, I would’ve started collecting them ages ago. She sort of resembles my mental image of the protagonist of Book 2 — not the hairstyle/clothing, of course, and Oree’s eyes are more of a no-color because she’s blind, and Oree’s darker-skinned. …OK, she looks nothing like Oree. =) But the spirit is there — the unworldliness underlain by pragmatism, which is how I interpret the Mesa Enchantress’ expression… and her staff. It’s natural and pretty, but it’s also a bigass stick.

It’s rare for fantasy art to speak to me this way. The only other examples I can think of are the odd piece by Todd Lockwood or Michael Whelan, and usually it’s landscapes that intrigue me, not characters. I’ll be keeping an eye on this Gallegos guy.

Next up (maybe) Lunacon!

Facebook now!

So after discovering that Twitter would not eat me (and in fact, I rather like it), I decided to brave my second-greatest dread: Facebook. Which I am now on; look for Nora Jemisin. I’ll be posting updates re my writer life there as well as here in this blog, and will also be using it to keep an eye on some other interesting folk who, lo and behold, haven’t been eaten by Facebook either. Imagine that!

I’m pretty much accepting all friend requests, and reciprocating if people don’t seem to mind. But sometimes I forget to check my profile there for a day or two, so bear with me if it takes a bit of time. =)

Oh, and see some of you at NYCC this weekend!

Schedule reset

So, back in August when I quit my dayjob and dedicated myself to The Writer Life ™, I set up this anal little program to try and keep myself on track, because I feared my ability to do so without official work hours and a commute, etc., to frame my day. I’m a Virgo; I need structure. The plan basically went like this:

  • Rise by 9 a.m. every day. Breakfast.
  • Bike to gym, work out at least 45 minutes.
  • Bike to coffee shop; write for several hours. Daily wordcount should be at least 1500, but will aim for 2000. Aim to spend less than $10 on coffee, lunch, and nibblies while I work. Will aim for not-so-sugary nibblies.
  • Go home and shower. Cook healthy meal. Go do errands or whatever daily stuff I need to do.
  • Come home, eat. Track calories on SparkPeople.
  • I will permit myself either one glass of wine or one dessert in the evenings.
  • Go to bed by 2 a.m.

Did this, more or less, for all of 2 months before moving to a new apartment destroyed the routine. In the past few days I’ve realized just how far off-track I’ve drifted (I routinely stay up ’til 4 a.m., frex), so time to recalibrate now that I’ve broken ground on Book 3. My new proposed plan is as follows:

  • Get up by 9 a.m. every day. Breakfast.
  • Bike/train to gym (at least 4 days/week; aim for 5) for workout of at least 1 hour (aim for 75 mins). On Saturdays, additionally bike to Farmer’s Market and library.
  • Bike/train to coffee shop or home; write for several hours. Daily wordcount should be at least 1000. Aim to spend less than $25/week on coffee and nibblies, which should be easy since I now have an office at home and no longer have to go to the coffee shop to get anything done.
  • Come home, shower, cook healthy meal. Eat if staying in. Eat lightly if going out, so I don’t eat so much while I’m out.
  • Aim to spend less than $50/week on eating out — tough in NYC, but I’ve got to rein that in; it’s my worst vice, and does me damage both financially and healthwise.
  • Permit myself 1 glass of wine, 1 hot chocolate (with a dash of Baileys and marshmallows if I so desire), 1 mulled apple cider, or dessert in the evenings. The hot chocolate and cider are seasonal things; my craving for them should fade as the weather warms again.
  • If I have to eat more, popcorn.
  • Go to bed by 2 am.

Have joined a small online group with friends also working on a novel for additional motivation. Hopefully that will help. So, wish me luck!


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